publications

Structure as Finish: The Smile features in this month’s Frame The Smile

Frame magazine has featured The Smile in its latest issue, No 114 Jan – Feb 2017.

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Frame magazine has featured The Smile in its latest issue, No 114 Jan – Feb 2017.

“You can build a friendly house out of flooring. For the American Hardwood Export Council and the London Design Festival, Alison Brooks Architects worked with Arup to realize, in cross-laminated tulipwood, the Smile: a 34-m-long rectangular dwelling. The hollow ‘tube’ illustrates the structural and aesthetic potential of an engineered timber harvested from fast-growing trees and suitable for building walls, floors and ceilings. Said to be stronger than concrete and machinable to super-high tolerances, the material can reduce construction time by up to 30% when used for prefabrication.” 

Source
Frame
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The Sunday Times – Six buildings making an impact this year Exeter College Cohen Quad

The Exeter College Cohen Quad was chosen by Jeremy Melvin of The Sunday Times as one of six buildings that will make an impact this year.

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The Exeter College Cohen Quad was chosen by Jeremy Melvin of The Sunday Times as one of six buildings that will make an impact this year.

“What makes this project notable among the crop of new buildings in Oxford and Cambridge is how it transforms the traditional spatial configurations of Oxbridge colleges. It manages to look to the future, using new technologies, while still catering to the traditional needs for accommodation and secure storage for special collections.

The central conceptual idea and physical space is the Learning Commons, a large volume offering levels of differing size and degrees of intimacy. Studious scholars can hide themselves away and study intently; others might spot people and exchange ideas.

This is not Oxford’s most flamboyant new building — Zaha Hadid’s work in 2015 on St Antony’s College, and Herzog & de Meuron’s Blavatnik School of Government, debuted last year, outdo it on that score — and it had to fit a lot of accommodation into a tight planning envelope. But it is perhaps the most far-reaching in showing how congenial spaces and new technologies might support academic life, just as the quad, the library and the printed book did 500 years ago.”

Source
The Sunday Times
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The Guardian’s best architecture of 2016 Ely Court

Rowan Moore of The Guardian chose our Ely Court project in Kilburn to represent the best of architecture of 2016.

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Rowan Moore of The Guardian chose our Ely Court project in Kilburn to represent the best of architecture of 2016.

 “The best news in the not-entirely-cheerful year of 2016, architecturally speaking, is that the finest new housing is being built by local authorities. Projects such as Alison Brooks’s Ely Court for the London borough of Brent, or similar works in the boroughs of Camden, Hackney and elsewhere, are showing that council homes do not have be the grim monoliths of legend. They are well considered and humanly scaled, with hospitable shared spaces, balconies you might actually want to sit on and other small but significant details. As central government is showing glimmers of realisation that volume housebuilders cannot meet the country’s needs alone, developments like these are part of the answer.

Source
The Guardian
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Architizer

Alison Brooks was featured as one of the ’26 Women Who Changed Architecture’ in this Architizer article.

“A London-based architect with a sculptor’s approach to shape and proportion, Alison Brooks is one of Britain’s most original architects. In 2013, she received the AJ Woman Architect of the Year Award. One of the judges, Paul Monaghan, applauded the panel’s choice, explaining that “her mixture of sculpture, architecture and detail is what has made her such a powerful force in British architecture.””

Alison Brooks was featured as one of the ’26 Women Who Changed Architecture’ in this Architizer article.

“A London-based architect with a sculptor’s approach to shape and proportion, Alison Brooks is one of Britain’s most original architects. In 2013, she received the AJ Woman Architect of the Year Award. One of the judges, Paul Monaghan, applauded the panel’s choice, explaining that “her mixture of sculpture, architecture and detail is what has made her such a powerful force in British architecture.””

Source
Architizer
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Detail The Smile

According to the American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC) is “The Smile”, the first construction project ever in the industrially manufactured hardwood CLT is used. The Arup engineers praise the material to be particularly efficient: A mere 60 cubic meters of wood were necessary to provide a constructed area of 150 square meters.”

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According to the American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC) is “The Smile”, the first construction project ever in the industrially manufactured hardwood CLT is used. The Arup engineers praise the material to be particularly efficient: A mere 60 cubic meters of wood were necessary to provide a constructed area of 150 square meters.”

Source
Detail
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Blueprint The Smile

“From Alex Chinneck’s upturned electricity pylon in Greenwich to dRMM’s Endless Stair outside Tate Modern, London Design Festival’s Landmark Projects invite architects and designers to create extraordinary installations and objects that engage with the public and push materials to their limits. This year sees Alison Brooks create a gravity-defying cross-laminated timber structure at the Chelsea College of Arts.

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“From Alex Chinneck’s upturned electricity pylon in Greenwich to dRMM’s Endless Stair outside Tate Modern, London Design Festival’s Landmark Projects invite architects and designers to create extraordinary installations and objects that engage with the public and push materials to their limits. This year sees Alison Brooks create a gravity-defying cross-laminated timber structure at the Chelsea College of Arts.

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Alison Brooks interview on BBC World Service The Smile

Alison Brooks spoke about The Smile to Vincent Dowd, Arts Correspondent of the BBC World Service on World Update at 10:06am on Friday 23.09.16.

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Alison Brooks spoke about The Smile to Vincent Dowd, Arts Correspondent of the BBC World Service on World Update at 10:06am on Friday 23.09.16.

Source
BBC World Update
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CNC The Smile

Chinese news channel CNC featured an interview of the Smile, accompanied by an interview with Alison Brooks.

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Chinese news channel CNC featured an interview of the Smile, accompanied by an interview with Alison Brooks.

Source
CNC
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Architects’ Journal The Smile

“Dubbed ’the most complex CLT structure ever built’, Alison Brooks and Arup present a 34m-long ’smile’ made of Tulipwood in the parade ground of Chelsea College, behind Tate Britain. ’It looks like high-quality flooring,’ says Brooks, ’too good to be structural — and that’s kind of amazing.’”

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“Dubbed ’the most complex CLT structure ever built’, Alison Brooks and Arup present a 34m-long ’smile’ made of Tulipwood in the parade ground of Chelsea College, behind Tate Britain. ’It looks like high-quality flooring,’ says Brooks, ’too good to be structural — and that’s kind of amazing.’”

Source
Architects' Journal
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OnOffice The Smile

“The Smile installation by Alison Brooks Architects and Arup is more than just an appealing structure – it’s producing data on hardwood use.”

“The Smile installation by Alison Brooks Architects and Arup is more than just an appealing structure – it’s producing data on hardwood use.”

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Londonist The Smile

“In the square outside Chelsea College of Arts, and across the road from Tate Modern, is a giant wooden ‘smile’ by Alison Brooks’ Architects. Visitors can walk inside and up the curved sides. The design is beautiful in its simplicity and the way natural light flows in. Exploring it definitely made us smile.”

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“In the square outside Chelsea College of Arts, and across the road from Tate Modern, is a giant wooden ‘smile’ by Alison Brooks’ Architects. Visitors can walk inside and up the curved sides. The design is beautiful in its simplicity and the way natural light flows in. Exploring it definitely made us smile.”

Source
Londonist
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Time Out The Smile

“This mighty hardwood structure is one of the landmark installations for this year’s London Design Festival. It’s been created by architect Alison Brooks, and despite the giant, curved structure looking like it should start rocking at any minute, the piece is designed to be entirely motionless. Visitors can step inside the ‘weightless funnel of space’ to discover an interior dappled with sunlight due to the perforations in the wooden walls, before it turns into a lantern like structure at night.”

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“This mighty hardwood structure is one of the landmark installations for this year’s London Design Festival. It’s been created by architect Alison Brooks, and despite the giant, curved structure looking like it should start rocking at any minute, the piece is designed to be entirely motionless. Visitors can step inside the ‘weightless funnel of space’ to discover an interior dappled with sunlight due to the perforations in the wooden walls, before it turns into a lantern like structure at night.”

Source
Time Out
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Inhabitat The Smile

“Visitors to the London Design Festival can experience an unusual curved building called The Smile. Designed by Alison Brooks of Alison Brooks Architects, the sloping structure demonstrates the potential of CLT, which Brooks says is “stronger than concrete.””

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“Visitors to the London Design Festival can experience an unusual curved building called The Smile. Designed by Alison Brooks of Alison Brooks Architects, the sloping structure demonstrates the potential of CLT, which Brooks says is “stronger than concrete.””

Source
Inhabitat
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Canadian Architect The Smile

“For AHEC, The Smile is one of the most important developments in a decade of research and development into structural timber innovation with Arup, and one that could broaden the use of CLT in the construction industry. Andrew Lawrence, Associate Director, Arup says, “The Smile is the most challenging structure ever constructed in CLT. Every aspect is pushed to the absolute limit. It really shows the potential for hardwoods in construction.”

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“For AHEC, The Smile is one of the most important developments in a decade of research and development into structural timber innovation with Arup, and one that could broaden the use of CLT in the construction industry. Andrew Lawrence, Associate Director, Arup says, “The Smile is the most challenging structure ever constructed in CLT. Every aspect is pushed to the absolute limit. It really shows the potential for hardwoods in construction.”

This creation of a brand-new product and a new use of hardwood will transform the way architects and engineers approach timber construction.”

Source
Canadian Architect
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CNN The Smile

“The Smile, designed by architect Alison Brooks, is the most complex structure ever to be made out of cross-laminated timber”

“If the 19th century belonged to iron and steel and the 20th century belonged to concrete, could timber be the building material of our age?”

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“The Smile, designed by architect Alison Brooks, is the most complex structure ever to be made out of cross-laminated timber”

“If the 19th century belonged to iron and steel and the 20th century belonged to concrete, could timber be the building material of our age?”

Source
CNN
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CNN

The Smile featured as the headline image of CNN’s illustrated guide to the London Design Festival 2016.

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The Smile featured as the headline image of CNN’s illustrated guide to the London Design Festival 2016.

Source
CNN
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Divisare The Smile

Italian website Divisare featured Alison Brooks Architects’ installation, The Smile – a collaboration with The American Hardwood Export Council, Arup and the London Design Festival.

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Italian website Divisare featured Alison Brooks Architects’ installation, The Smile – a collaboration with The American Hardwood Export Council, Arup and the London Design Festival.

Source
Divisare
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BBC Radio London The Smile

Alison Brooks was interviewed on this BBC Radio London programme about LDF landmark project, The Smile. In the link below, she begins speaking at 02:06:54.

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Alison Brooks was interviewed on this BBC Radio London programme about LDF landmark project, The Smile. In the link below, she begins speaking at 02:06:54.

Source
BBC Radio London
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The Spaces The Smile

“Before this week, few people truly believed you could use hardwood cross-laminated timber (CLT) to support an entire habitable building – not least the construction business. That’s why ‘The Smile’, on view in the courtyard of the Chelsea College of Art until mid-October, has become a landmark project for the London Design Festival.”

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“Before this week, few people truly believed you could use hardwood cross-laminated timber (CLT) to support an entire habitable building – not least the construction business. That’s why ‘The Smile’, on view in the courtyard of the Chelsea College of Art until mid-October, has become a landmark project for the London Design Festival.”

Source
The Spaces
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