publications

BD The Smile

ABA’s The Smile was profiled in an article entitled ‘Is hardwood the future of timber construction?’

“As Alison Brooks Architects’ gravity-defying installation at the London Design Festival shows off the structural benefits of cross-laminated hardwood, Amanda Birch examines the growing uptake of CLT solutions”

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ABA’s The Smile was profiled in an article entitled ‘Is hardwood the future of timber construction?’

“As Alison Brooks Architects’ gravity-defying installation at the London Design Festival shows off the structural benefits of cross-laminated hardwood, Amanda Birch examines the growing uptake of CLT solutions”

Source
bdonline
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Dezeen The Smile

“According to Arup engineer Andrew Lawrence… “The Smile is the most complex CLT structure that has ever been built,””

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“According to Arup engineer Andrew Lawrence… “The Smile is the most complex CLT structure that has ever been built,””

“”Not only does it have a double cantilever, but the entrance door is placed right at the centre where the stresses are highest. You’re effectively looking at two 15-metre cantilevers,” he continued. If you turned the structure vertically and added the weight of 60 visitors at one end, it’s equivalent to the core stabilising a five-storey building. Nobody has ever built a core that slender in timber.””

Source
Dezeen
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Elle Decoration The Smile

“At Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground, Millbank, you’ll find this extraordinary 36-metre-long ‘megatube’ installation by architect Alison Brooks. Despite only balancing on a single point, the curved structure is safe to stroll along. At night, it will be lit from within, with its glow bright enough to be seen from across the River Thames.”

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“At Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground, Millbank, you’ll find this extraordinary 36-metre-long ‘megatube’ installation by architect Alison Brooks. Despite only balancing on a single point, the curved structure is safe to stroll along. At night, it will be lit from within, with its glow bright enough to be seen from across the River Thames.”

Elle Decoration featured The Smile in its highlights of the London Design Festival 2016.

The Smile is a collaboration between Alison Brooks Architects, The American Hardwood Export Council, Arup and the London Design Festival. It is a cross-laminated tulipwood structure that will be on the Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground of the Chelsea College of Arts from 17 September until 12 October 2016.

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Hindustan Times The Smile

“Canadian artist Alison Brooks has designed a huge wooden structure called “The Smile” for London Design Week, located in the Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground of the Chelsea College of Arts.

This unusual urban object is, in fact, an arc-shaped 34-meter long and 3-meter high pavilion with open ends that flood the inside with light. Visitors can even take a stroll inside.”

[more..]

“Canadian artist Alison Brooks has designed a huge wooden structure called “The Smile” for London Design Week, located in the Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground of the Chelsea College of Arts.

This unusual urban object is, in fact, an arc-shaped 34-meter long and 3-meter high pavilion with open ends that flood the inside with light. Visitors can even take a stroll inside.”

Source
Hindustan Times
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Metro The Smile

The Metro newspaper featured Alison Brooks Architects’ landmark LDF project, the Smile, as their top highlight for the London Design Festival.

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The Metro newspaper featured Alison Brooks Architects’ landmark LDF project, the Smile, as their top highlight for the London Design Festival.

The Smile is a collaboration between Alison Brooks Architects and The American Hardwood Export Council, Arup and the London Design Festival. It is a cross-laminated tulipwood structure that will be on the Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground of the Chelsea College of Arts from 17 September until 12 October 2016.

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Design Week The Smile

“A regular favourite is the installation created with the American Hardwood Council. In recent years we’ve seen dRMM Architects’ Escher-inspired Endless Stair and Amanda Levete’s Endless Wave.

“This year, The Smile has been created by architect Alison Brooks. It’s a 34 metre curved wooden structure that you can walk in and around.”

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“A regular favourite is the installation created with the American Hardwood Council. In recent years we’ve seen dRMM Architects’ Escher-inspired Endless Stair and Amanda Levete’s Endless Wave.

“This year, The Smile has been created by architect Alison Brooks. It’s a 34 metre curved wooden structure that you can walk in and around.”

“Its two ends sitting three metres off the ground will offer viewing platforms and a new perspective to see surrounding buildings.”

 

Source
Design Week
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Architects’ Journal Olympicopolis: Sadler’s Wells & Smithsonian

The proposals for the Olympicopolis produced by Alison Brooks Architects’ team, led by Aecom, were featured in this summary of the competition.

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The proposals for the Olympicopolis produced by Alison Brooks Architects’ team, led by Aecom, were featured in this summary of the competition.

Alison Brooks Architects were on one of six teams shortlisted to design a new cultural quarter at the London 2012 Olympic Park, expected to include new outposts of the V&A and Smithsonian museums. On a team with AECOM, Stanton Williams, AKT II, Asif Khan, Carmody Groarke, Charcoalblue and Haworth Tompkins, ABA designed the Sadler’s Wells and Smithsonian.

Source
Architects' Journal
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Designboom The Smile

“for AHEC, the project is one of the most important developments in a decade of research and development into structural timber innovation. ‘this structure proves that hardwoods have a role to play in the timber construction revolution,’ says david venables, european director of AHEC. ‘the smile is the most challenging structure ever constructed in CLT,’ adds andrew lawrence, associate director at arup. ‘every aspect is pushed to the absolute limit. it really shows the potential for hardwoods in construction.’”

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“for AHEC, the project is one of the most important developments in a decade of research and development into structural timber innovation. ‘this structure proves that hardwoods have a role to play in the timber construction revolution,’ says david venables, european director of AHEC. ‘the smile is the most challenging structure ever constructed in CLT,’ adds andrew lawrence, associate director at arup. ‘every aspect is pushed to the absolute limit. it really shows the potential for hardwoods in construction.’”

Source
Designboom
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Financial Times The Smile

“On the Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground, architect Alison Brooks has created a 34-metre rectangular tube arcing upwards at either end. “The Smile”, one of the festival’s landmark projects, is designed to be an immersive pavilion. The tube forms an open-air balcony at either end, framing particular views of the sky, and its perforated walls mediate a dappled light throughout the interior. The gravity-defying structure, with its curving internal landscape illuminated at night by sweeping light strips, is also “crying out for someone to skateboard on it”, says Brooks.”

[more..]

“On the Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground, architect Alison Brooks has created a 34-metre rectangular tube arcing upwards at either end. “The Smile”, one of the festival’s landmark projects, is designed to be an immersive pavilion. The tube forms an open-air balcony at either end, framing particular views of the sky, and its perforated walls mediate a dappled light throughout the interior. The gravity-defying structure, with its curving internal landscape illuminated at night by sweeping light strips, is also “crying out for someone to skateboard on it”, says Brooks.”

Source
Financial Times
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Wallpaper The Smile

Wallpaper Magazine featured The Smile in its review of the highlights of London Design Festival 2016.

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Wallpaper Magazine featured The Smile in its review of the highlights of London Design Festival 2016.

The Smile is a collaboration between Alison Brooks Architects and The American Hardwood Export Council, Arup and the London Design Festival. It is a cross-laminated tulipwood structure that will be on the Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground of the Chelsea College of Arts from 17 September until 12 October 2016.

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Icon

Icon published this 6-page interview with Alison Brooks, looking at 20 years of the practice’s work.

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Icon published this 6-page interview with Alison Brooks, looking at 20 years of the practice’s work.

Source
Icon
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Architects’ Journal Ely Court Kilburn Quarter Durham & Gloucester Court

This article titled ‘Brent Council’s plan to rebuild 1,200 social homes in South Kilburn’ features Alison Brooks Architects’ three projects within the South Kilburn Estate Regeneration Masterplan.

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This article titled ‘Brent Council’s plan to rebuild 1,200 social homes in South Kilburn’ features Alison Brooks Architects’ three projects within the South Kilburn Estate Regeneration Masterplan.

Source
Architects' Journal
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Architects’ Journal Ely Court

“Alison Brooks Architects’ RIBA Award-winning Ely Court sets a precedent for the rest of the masterplan to follow.”

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“Alison Brooks Architects’ RIBA Award-winning Ely Court sets a precedent for the rest of the masterplan to follow.”

Source
Architects' Journal
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Architects’ Journal Veteran Oak Quarter Ely Court Kilburn Quarter Durham & Gloucester Court

This article proposes two developments featuring Alison Brooks Architects’ projects as exemplars for architects’ collaboration with developers and stakeholders to form new communities.

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This article proposes two developments featuring Alison Brooks Architects’ projects as exemplars for architects’ collaboration with developers and stakeholders to form new communities.

“A few simple lessons can be learned from the approach at North West Cambridge and South Kilburn: put the detail in the planning application and stay on top of the contractor, ensuring they build to the architect’s specification and design; keep the original architect involved, preferably novated; don’t fall into the viability trap by partnering with a developer who will overload your site and ruin the project to boost their profits; and make sure you are building a community, not just homes.”

Source
Architects' Journal
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Architects’ Journal Veteran Oak Quarter

Alison Brooks Architects’ Veteran Oak Quarter featured in this article about the wider North West Cambridge Development, titled ‘How the University of Cambridge is building a community for its staff’.

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Alison Brooks Architects’ Veteran Oak Quarter featured in this article about the wider North West Cambridge Development, titled ‘How the University of Cambridge is building a community for its staff’.

Source
Architects' Journal
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The Sunday Times The Smile

The totem of this year’s London Design Festival (September 17-25) is a great big grin. The architect Alison Brooks has designed a pavilion in cross-laminated American tulipwood, in the shape of an 11ft-high, 110ft-long smile. The installation at Chelsea College of Arts could “transformthe way architects and engineers approach timber construction”, says David Venables, European director of the American Hardwood Export Council. The confident curve echoes the organisers’ bullish portrayal of London as “design capital of the world”.”

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The totem of this year’s London Design Festival (September 17-25) is a great big grin. The architect Alison Brooks has designed a pavilion in cross-laminated American tulipwood, in the shape of an 11ft-high, 110ft-long smile. The installation at Chelsea College of Arts could “transformthe way architects and engineers approach timber construction”, says David Venables, European director of the American Hardwood Export Council. The confident curve echoes the organisers’ bullish portrayal of London as “design capital of the world”.”

Source
The Times
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Azure

“A gravity-bending structure by Alison Brooks Architects at the London Design Festival highlights the flexibility of cross-laminated timber.”

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“A gravity-bending structure by Alison Brooks Architects at the London Design Festival highlights the flexibility of cross-laminated timber.”

Source
Azure
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Dezeen The Smile

The Smile gave the headline image to this article entitled ‘The 10 top installations and exhibitions at London Design Festival 2016′.

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The Smile gave the headline image to this article entitled ‘The 10 top installations and exhibitions at London Design Festival 2016′.

Source
Dezeen
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Building for Life

Ely Court features as an exemplar project in the 2016 edition of Building for Life 12 (BfL12), a leading guide for creating well-designed homes and neighbourhoods.

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Ely Court features as an exemplar project in the 2016 edition of Building for Life 12 (BfL12), a leading guide for creating well-designed homes and neighbourhoods.

Endorsed by government and managed by three partners – Design Council CABE, Design for Homes and the Home Builders Federation – BfL12 is integral to the UK’s commitment to build more and better homes.

Reinvented in 2012 to reflect the National Planning Policy Framework, BfL12 was also designed to support the Government’s commitment to:

  • Building more homes
  • Building better designed homes and neighbourhoods
  • Creating a more creative and collaborative planning system
  • Involving local communities in shaping development proposals
Source
Building for Life
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ArchDaily Ely Court

Ely Court was featured on ‘the world’s most visited architecture website’.

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Ely Court was featured on ‘the world’s most visited architecture website’.

Source
ArchDaily
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